Bust of Nefertiti - The Egyptian Sun Queen
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Bust of Nefertiti - The Egyptian Sun Queen

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Bust of Nefertiti, aka The Egyptian Sun Queen. Made from PLA.

Approx 8" tall marble/rock matte color PLA bust pictured.

This item is made to order. Shipping times will vary depending on the size of the item that is ordered. Shipping times generally range from 24 hours up to 1 week. All items on your order will be shipped at the same time once the custom item is complete. 

Background/History
Nefertiti (meaning "the beautiful one has come forth") was the 14th-century BC Great Royal Wife (chief consort) of the Egyptian Pharaoh Akhenaten of the Eighteenth Dynasty of Egypt. Akhenaten initiated a new monotheistic form of worship called Atenism dedicated to the Sun disc Aten. Little is known about Nefertiti. Theories suggest she could have been an Egyptian royal by birth, a foreign princess or the daughter of a high government official named Ay, who became pharaoh after Tutankhamun. She may have been the co-regent of Egypt with Akhenaten, who ruled from 1352 BC to 1336 BC Nefertiti bore six daughters to Akhenaten, one of whom, Ankhesenpaaten (renamed Ankhesenamun after the suppression of the Aten cult), married Tutankhamun, Nefertiti's stepson. While it was once thought that Nefertiti disappeared in the twelfth year of Akhenaten's reign because of her death or because she took a new name, she was still alive in the sixteenth year of her husband's reign according to a limestone quarry inscription found at Dayr Abū Ḥinnis "on the eastern side of the Nile, about ten kilometres north of Amarna." Nefertiti may have become a pharaoh in her own right for a short time after her husband's death.

The bust of Nefertiti is believed to have been crafted about 1345 BC by the sculptor Thutmose. The bust does not have any inscriptions, but can be certainly identified as Nefertiti by the characteristic crown, which she wears in other surviving (and clearly labelled) depictions, for example the "house altar"


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